First Become Alone

First become alone. First start enjoying yourself. First love  yourself. First become so authentically happy that if nobody comes it doesn’t  matter; you are full, overflowing. If nobody knocks at your door it is   perfectly okay — YOU are not missing. You are not waiting for somebody to come and knock at the door. You are at home. If somebody comes, good, beautiful. If  nobody comes, that too is beautiful and good.

THEN move into relationship. Now you move like a master, not like a  beggar. Now you move like an emperor,. not like a beggar. And the person who has lived in his aloneness will always be attracted to another person
who is also living his aloneness beautifully, because the same attracts the same. When two masters meet — masters of their being, of their aloneness — happiness is not just added, it is multiplied. It becomes a tremendous phenomenon of celebration. And they don’t exploit, they share. They don’t use each other. Rather, on the contrary, they both become one and enjoy the existence that surrounds them. Two lonely people are always facing each other, confronting. Two people who have known aloneness are together, facing something higher than both. I  always give this example: two ordinary lovers who are both lonely always face each other; two real lovers, on a full moon night, will not be facing each other. They may be holding hands, but they will be facing the full moon  high in the sky. They will not be facing each other, they will be together facing something else.

Sometimes they will be listening to a symphony of Mozart or Beethoven or  Wagner together. Sometimes they will be sitting by the side of a tree and enjoying the tremendous being of the tree enveloping them. Sometimes
they may be sitting by a waterfall and listening to the wild music that is continuously being created there. Sometimes, by the ocean, they will both be looking to the farthest possibility that the eyes can see. Whenever two lonely persons meet, they look at each other, because they are constantly in search of ways and means to exploit the other: how to use the other, how to be happy through the other. But two persons who are
deeply contented within themselves are not trying to use each other. Rather, they become fellow travellers; they move on a pilgrimage. The goal is high, the goal is far away. Their common interest joins them together.
OSHO

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